By AJ Willingham, CNN

Disney is saying goodbye to Bob and hello to, well ... a different Bob. The company ousted CEO Bob Chapek, and is bringing former CEO Bob Iger back to the helm. It's quite the media shakeup. Here's what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day.

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1. Colorado shooting

Officials are investigating whether the shooting at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs was a bias-motivated crime. Hate crimes in Colorado are referred to as "bias-motivated," according to the county's district attorney. The 22-year-old suspected shooter is still hospitalized after being taken down by two club patrons. He is also reportedly not speaking to investigators. Richard Fierro, one of the two who subdued the shooter, is a former Army major who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. He said the violence and trauma experienced during the shooting was like that of a war zone. Members of the bar's staff, a mother and a first-time patron are among the five victims killed in the attack.

2. Rail strike

The US could face a crippling national freight rail strike soon after rank-and-file members of the nation's largest rail union rejected a tentative labor deal with freight railroads. There are 12 unions that represent various types of rail workers in the US, and this particular union represents the industry's conductors. All 12 unions have now made decisions on new contracts, with a total of four unions voting against their contracts. Now, the dissenting unions will remain on the job until at least early next month as negotiations continue to stave off a strike. If even a single union decides to strike, the others will honor picket lines, shutting down the railroads. If the strike were to continue for some time, it would be devastating for American supply chains and consumer costs. (About 30% of US freight moves by rail.) If things get really bad, Congress could intervene.

3. Twitter

Laid-off employees at Twitter's Africa headquarters are now accusing the company of discrimination and intimidation. The team, which is based in Accra, Ghana, has hired a lawyer and sent a letter demanding Twitter comply with the West African nation's labor laws. Those laws indicate they should be provided with additional severance pay and other relevant benefits, in line with what Twitter employees in other regions will receive after massive layoffs at the company earlier this month. Several of the employees also moved to Ghana for the job, and are now demanding assistance with repatriation. Meanwhile, Elon Musk says Twitter is "holding off" restarting its paid verification plan after the initial rollout resulted in a swarm of accounts impersonating brands and public figures.

4. Voting

The results of the midterm elections are still reverberating through several states. In Georgia, voters are preparing for a December Senate runoff between incumbent Democrat Raphael Warnock and his Republican challenger Herschel Walker. An appeals court has ruled the state can offer early voting the Saturday after Thanksgiving, rejecting a plea from state election officials who say that particular early voting date violates state law because it follows a shortened holiday week. State Democrats are hailing the decision as a win for voters. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court has dismissed a challenge to Texas state legislative maps that critics say intentionally dilute minority voting power and result in an illegal racial gerrymander.

5. Iran

People detained by Iranian security forces during the country's ongoing protests have told CNN in harrowing detail about multiple instances of sexual assault and intimidation while in custody. In recent weeks, social media videos have emerged allegedly showing Iranian security forces sexually assaulting female demonstrators on the streets. Reports of sexual violence against activists in prisons have also surfaced. CNN's reporting corroborated these accounts and uncovered many more. In some of the cases, the assault was filmed and used to blackmail the protesters into silence, according to sources who spoke to the victims. Read the victims' stories here. As unrest continues in the country, members of Iran's soccer team remained silent as the Iranian national anthem played at the World Cup before their match against England Monday. The gesture appeared to show solidarity with protesters back home.

BREAKFAST BROWSE

Brandy will reprise her 1997 Cinderella role in a new Disney 'Descendants' movie

Kids will watch for the mega-popular 'Descendants' franchise. Adults will watch for the unmatched 90's nostalgia.

Wales and USMNT tie in World Cup match after late penalty kick

Finally, something that can unite us all: Being grumpy about World Cup results.

'The Walking Dead' comes to an end after 11 seasons

So ... are all of the "Walking Dead" spin-offs kind of like zombies now?

President Biden pardons two turkeys, Chocolate and Chip

Turkeys are terrifying. I'm not saying they deserve to be cooked and eaten, just that they don't really deserve pardons, either. They know why.

Lionel Messi and Argentina play Saudi Arabia today

TODAY'S NUMBER

43

That's how many years President Teodoro Obiang of That's how many years President Teodoro Obiang of Equatorial Guinea has been in office. Obiang, 80, is the world's longest-ruling head of state. He looks set to extend his time in power after his ruling party came out on top in the country's latest elections. However, allegations of intimidation and arrests of opposition supporters in Equatorial Guinea have made international election watchers uneasy. has been in office. Obiang, 80, is the world's longest-ruling leader. He looks set to extend his time in power after his ruling party came out on top in the country's latest elections. However, allegations of intimidation and arrests of opposition supporters in Equatorial Guinea have made international election watchers uneasy.

TODAY'S QUOTE

"La Sentencia"

- A Spanish phrase, meaning "the sentence," that colloquially describes a controversial 2013 decision by the Dominican Republic's constitutional court that ruled that Dominicans born in the country to undocumented parents should be stripped of their citizenship -- rendering tens of thousands of people stateless. As a result of "La Sentencia" and other, sometimes dubious immigration measures, legions of people have been expelled from the country. That includes about 1,800 children in the last year, according to the UN.

TODAY'S WEATHER

AND FINALLY

A big yawn for a small frog

Do you ever feel like a tired, grumpy frog who just wants to be left alone to bury itself in the dirt? Yeah, me too. (Click here to view)

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